Blog

Agile Inspires Betterness

We currently witness the beginning of a new era. It has been given various names, as nobody is yet able to predict its nature. It’s been called the conceptual age, information is not enough anymore. Relationships become more important, where “knowledge stacks are replaced by knowledge flows”. Abundance, connections and choice change the game: “Mass is dead. Here comes weird.”

On
2 February 2012
In
Agile with a Purpose
Tags
agile, betterness, purpose

    Classical strategic planning is based upon the assumption of a slowly changing future. This assumption is wrong.”

    Noah Rahford 

    We currently witness the beginning of a new era. It has been given various names, as nobody is yet able to predict its nature. It’s been called the conceptual age, information is not enough anymore. Relationships become more important, where “knowledge stacks are replaced by knowledge flows”. Abundance, connections and choice change the game: “Mass is dead. Here comes weird.” 

    It’s a paradigm shift. We haven't yet figured out where it will lead our kind, as we can not predict the future. Two things are clear about the outcome:

    It will be emergent and powered by software.

    Which might make it worthwhile to look at business the way software developers do, and how that view changed over the last few decades. I’ll draw a line from software development to business transformations in general, and where these should lead us.

    What’s Special About Software Development?

    “It’s tough to make predictions, especially about the future.

    Yogi Berra, Baseball Catcher 

    When companies started to develop software, they wanted to automate work that had been done manually before. The method they employed seemed straightforward: analyse the problem, model a solution, automate that model. But wait: More often than not, users of these systems started to claim changes. We found that users wanted to use the software we had written for purposes that we had not expected. This created a reinforcing loop: Today, most innovations in software solve previously non-existing problems—making predictions harder and harder.

    Nonetheless, we tried harder to “design” the future. But no matter how much effort we put into better predicting the future, we did not find the silver bullet that made our intended future happen. We refined scientific management but only came up with busier people, instead of better solutions. We found out the hard way that in a complex domain, best practices are not appropriate anymore.

    Where Agile Came From

    Then some people tried a different approach: experimentation combined with empirical process control. This approach succeeded and evolved into a mindset we call Agile. Agile is a set of values and principles based on complexity thinking. As software became more complex, we adapted our practices until they evolved into Agile. Instead of trying to anticipate the future we wish would come, we work with quick feedback cycles to frame actions as safe-to-fail experiments and validate our learning. This way we can frequently check if we developed something of value. This approach did not only work well with the software we created, but also for the organisational changes it inspired in companies adopting Agile.

    Transformation

    Applying this experience in the field, over the years, the agile community learned useful lessons about organisational change. How a classical, hierarchical structure can be transformed into a fluid, innovative system. Such an enterprise will “operate balanced at the knife-edge of maximum effectiveness, on the optimal cusp between orderly working and chaotic collapse.”

    Most businesses today struggle with change. Most strategies that made businesses successful do not work anymore today, or might not work anymore in the future. The complexity that hit software development in the 80s and 90s hits nearly all industries today. I think we should learn from agile examples.

    Betterness Transformation

    Betterness

    Yet what should we transform into? We do not yet know where the paradigm shift will lead us. Do we need to know? I do not think so, for two reasons:

    Making your organisation adaptive to change will make it resilient to whatever the future holds. And: there is a purpose which will be valid for any kind of future: We should make this world a better place. If you think that’s not your business, consider the alternative: do you want your organisation to make things worse?

    An economist phrased it this way: “I call this positive paradigm betterness; in contrast with business, it’s not about being busier and busier (to what end?) but about becoming better. I believe it’s the next step in the evolution of prosperity and that its foundational principle is living lives that matter in human terms. [...] So let’s roll up our sleeves and reimagine prosperity for the twenty-first century.”

    This is our purpose. Let’s change the world.

    Sources of Inspiration

    Thank you Umair HaqueAndrea Provaglio, Bob Marshall, Dave Snowden and many others to inspire me with ideas that went into this post. Special Thanks to Paolo Perrotta for reviewing and editing it with me!


    Discussion 1 Comment

    I like the label "betterness", but find it a bit vague. The idea of "wellbeing", borrowed from Prof Seligman and his book on Positive Psychology titled "Flourish", works better (sic) for me. In any case, I share your view that it's well past time we all took a long hard look at where our world is going, and our own roles in that journey.

    - Bob

    (required)

    (required)


    (required)


    (required)
    Refresh captcha

     

    Latest entries

    Notes from the Scrumtisch Berlin - September 29, 2014

    Thanks to everybody who joined the Scrumtisch in Berlin on Monday. Here are some pictures of ...

    0 Comments

    Trapped in Wagile

    Organizations that are attempting to transition to Agile demonstrate waterfall characteristics - residually or resurgently.

    4 Comments

    Effectively Coaching Agile Teams at Scrum Gathering Berlin

    At the Scrum Gathering Berlin 2014, coaches Bent Myllerup and Andrea Tomasini, facilitated a workshop called ...

    0 Comments

    Our Scrum training calendar for Seattle, Houston, Denver, Vancouver

    Scrum certifications and training in the United States and Canada for our North America Fall/Winter season ...

    0 Comments

    Scrumtisch September 2014

    29. September 2014 - Scrumtisch in Berlin

    0 Comments