April 4, 2009

Scott Ambler on Agile

scottamblerScott Ambler talking in Cape Town. For free! One of the Agile thought leaders, now working at IBM Rational. Also a notorious Scrum maligner. I had to go. If only to be equipped to do damage control. So I pitched up with as open a mind as any Scrum Coach and Trainer could...

After coffee and muffins, nearly 200 people filled the small Sports Science auditorium. Scott gave a discursive and entertaining three-hour talk that spanned a number of threads. His blunt style evoked laughter as the audience identified with many of his observations. Here are some of the things I heard him say - I think.

Myths and Facts



  • Software development is an art rather than science with people rather than technology at its core.

  • IT organisations all over the world are messed up in more-or-less the same ways; all making the same mistakes, due to all basing their way of working on the same set of false premises.

  • They discover a problem, put a band-aid over it, discover another problem, fit another band aid and so on. Nothing actually gets fixed.

  • Traditional project management is based on lying, and stakeholders know this.

  • Earned value management is another lie - there is no value until the software is delivered. It is just not the right metric.

  • The US has a $600 billion data quality problem. And it's not getting smaller.

  • We (IT) are not professionals - we don't get respect from anybody.

  • Most organisations choose to fail - it's more comfortable to fail in familiar ways than to succeed in unfamiliar ways.

  • Project retrospectives don't work - the lessons 'learned' are not put into practice, because the project has ended and there is no longer motivation to do so.

  • Doing things against natural human behaviour will always fail.

  • Every hand-off is a risk and a point at which defects are introduced.

  • Media richness theory tells us that the best way to communicate is face-to-face and the worst is via written documents.

  • Change management is a euphemism for change prevention and is unethical.

  • Logged defects older than a year are waste and should be deleted.

  • The most valuable artefact to Agile developers is working software; the least valuable is Gantt charts.

  • There is no statistical difference between the success of projects in organisations who implement the CMMI and those who don't, whether Agile or not. There is a significant difference in success between Agile and not.

  • Collocated Agile teams report a 79% project success rate compared with 73% who are "near located" and only 55% who are "far located" (requires air travel).

  • Collocation results in increased job satisfaction.

  • Near location often needs only a "decorating decision" to save 6% and payback is achieved in one week!

  • Regarding distributed teams: (1) don't; (2) observe Conway's Law - distribute in relation to your architecture; and (3) use appropriate tools and techniques.

  • Most distributed development is based on a lack of trust.

  • Beware of off-shoring: if you're failing now to manage your own people locally, there is no chance you will succeed in managing people off-shore.

  • Fire the evil bastards who hang art on the wall in your IT department! Fill all walls with white boards or whote board wallpaper.

  • A repeatable process in software development is nonsense. In every instance there will be changes for scaling, distribution, domain, people, ...

  • The bureaucrats are out of control...and so are the HR people!

  • You can change your organisation [fix it] or you can change your organisation [move to another]!

  • Lean ("optimise the whole") helps explain why Agile works

  • Two-thirds of software features built are rarely or never used (Standish report) - so don't build them! The product backlog addresses the risk of building the wrong things.

  • Business wants estimates in order to manage financial risk. Agile makes this unnecessary - we only have to fund one iteration (at a time).

  • The iron triangle - one of scope, schedule and cost has to be variable; if you fix all three vertices, quality becomes the undesired variable.

  • Traditional development is gambling! We need to remind management that they got burned in the past and there is (now) a better way.

  • Fixed price work is unethical. As wannabe professionals we need to stand up to the bureaucratic treadmill.

  • Every developer should attend a two-day "introduction to usability" course. And an "introduction to security" course.

  • There are simple ways to refactor databases - to learn how, buy Scott's book!


Call to Action


Scott made a clear call to action amongst IT and business managers in organisations:

  1. Start experimenting with Agile. This is the easiest decision in decades for management to make! There is a very big upside with very little downside.

  2. Train your people.

  3. Get some help (coaching).


Despite his sniping at Scrum, I was pleasantly surprised at the sense he made. And I hope local organisations heed his call - my phone should ring off the hook on Monday...
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Peter Hundermark

Peter has worked with iterative and incremental software development processes since 1999, focusing on Scrum and Agile practices since 2006. In 2007 he started Scrum Sense in South Africa. He has introduced Scrum into scores of development teams locally and in Brazil. He leads certified Scrum training classes in South Africa and elsewhere. He is a Certified Scrum Coach and Certified Scrum Trainer.
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Image of peterhundermark

Peter Hundermark

Peter has worked with iterative and incremental software development processes since 1999, focusing on Scrum and Agile practices since 2006. In 2007 he started Scrum Sense in South Africa. He has introduced Scrum into scores of development teams locally and in Brazil. He leads certified Scrum training classes in South Africa and elsewhere. He is a Certified Scrum Coach and Certified Scrum Trainer.

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