Feb. 11, 2016

Meet The Coach: Daniel Lynn

In this interview, Agile Coach Daniel Lynn, shares the inspiration for doing what he does so well

1. Can you summarize for us your career path and how you came to be an Agile coach?

My career path was a bit winding. I started programming as a kid and that led me into early jobs writing software - mostly continuing education software for universities and government agencies. Eventually, I set software development aside to spend a few years working in data center operations. However, a number of projects in what we would now call DevOps brought me back to development. 

Building software that automates datacenter automation can be hectic and about this time, our team started learning about Scrum as a way to put some sense and order around our work. I very quickly came to love working on Scrum projects and our team began adopting XP practices and ideas from other parts of agile.  As the team grew, I began managing teams of developers and testers and it gave me a whole new perspective on what it takes to deliver great software. 

Daniel Lynn

After eight years at that company, felt like it was time to expand my understanding of how other companies work, so I started working contracts as a project manager, scrum master, or agile coach. During that time I got to meet Brad and Richard, other coaches at agile42. I talked to coaches from other companies too, but something about the agile42 approach really resonated with me. 

So, here I am a year into my journey with agile42 and I couldn’t be happier. I get to join our clients for a really exciting time in their organization and I’m constantly encountering new and exciting challenges.

2. What are your 3 tips for Agile managers?

i. Trust your team. The best managers I’ve worked with know that their team is great. They never have to question if the team will do good work and their role is to make sure the team has what they need. 

ii. Grow your team. There’s a difference between allowing your team to continuously improve and joining them on the journey. Those teams where everyone is a top performer aren’t assembled, they’re cultivated.

iii. Get excited. When I first became a manager, I got some great guidance: You have to love watching other people succeed. If you approach working with others like a contract, then that’s how they’ll approach delivering work. If you are excited to work with them, they’ll be excited to deliver value.

3. What is the main inspiration for what you do?

I could say that it’s getting to see teams succeed where they may have been struggling before, but it’s more than that.  If it was just teams not meeting a deadline and then they do meet it, coaching would get boring pretty fast. What’s really amazing to me and gets me excited is how they succeed. I get to watch teams come up with innovative solutions to problems that could have never come about in traditional big-design approaches. 

4. What have you seen lately that is interesting and new in the world of Agile?

Oddly enough, some of the most interesting things I’m seeing in Agile aren’t that new. I’m seeing more of a return to core concepts and principles. After a period that saw a lot of effort go into understanding how to scale Agile and how to account for edge cases, it seems like people are circling back to some of the original ideas about Agile being a better way to create great products and strengthening those ideals in all of the practices that have come about over the past decade or so.

5. What is your favorite non-fiction book and why?

I’d be hard-pressed to pick a favorite, but one that I don’t think is on many people’s reading list in the Agile community is Blue Ocean Strategy by W. Chan Kin and Renee Mauborgne. It was one of the first books that I read that keyed in on understanding the real needs and behaviors of your target users and focused on that as being the center of effective business strategies. 

 

Image of ygmcadam

Yolanda McAdam

blog comments powered by Disqus
Image of ygmcadam

Yolanda McAdam

Latest Posts

Scrumtisch September 2019

The Berlin Scrum User Group meets on September 30th at agile42, Gruenberger Str. 54, 10245 Berlin.

Image of aballer

Alexandra Baller

agile42 Team Assistant

The Scrum Master as an organizational multi-function pocket knife

The Scrum Master is a jack of all trades with a magic problem-solving knife in his back pocket or a master of Scrum?


Image of elrich.faul

Elrich Faul

I’m passionate about helping the current and next generations to develop the skills they need to be successful in a rapidly changing world. I believe that by leveraging my expertise in engineering, psychology and management I can empower individuals and teams to reach their maximum potential. I’m inspired when given the opportunity to coach teams as well as individuals toward growth and happiness.

Campaigning for Dave

agile42 coach Dave Sharrock is running for Scrum Alliance Member Elected Director and we support his candidacy!

Image of abragad

Alessio Bragadini

Web community manager of agile42, trying to post relevant, informational, fun bits of content on the blog and social networks

Talking agility at Agile Islands conference

Pascal Papathemelis and the agile42 team will be present at the Agile Islands 2019 conference in the Åland Islands

Image of pascal

Pascal Papathemelis

Pascal has worked as an agile project manager/scrum master/facilitator of various developments in size and type for almost two decades. His focus is on people and practical approaches in order to deliver value. Currently Pascal is working at agile42 as an agile coach on a journey to help organisations and individuals grow, improve and become more efficient in a sustainable way.

Coaching at the Nordic Business Forum in Helsinki

Giuseppe De Simone will represent the Scrum Alliance at Nordic Business Forum in Helsinki, October 9-10 providing agile conversations to attendees

Image of giuseppe.desimone

Giuseppe De Simone

Giuseppe De Simone is a Certified Scrum Trainer (CST), Certified Enterprise Coach (CEC) and Certified Team Coach (CTC), passionate about helping individuals, teams and organizations become more productive by embracing Agile values, principles and practices. He is one of very few to be accredited from the Scrum Alliance as an educator of the Certified Agile Leadership and Path to CSP programs.